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Should Guns Be Allowed On Movie Sets, Whether Fake Or Real?
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Should Guns Be Allowed On Movie Sets, Whether Fake Or Real? 

The Outlaw, an American Western film directed by Howard Hughes in 1943, was a pioneer in the use of guns in film.

By Omotayo Olutekunbi

A prop gun on a television set killed Jon-Erik Hexum, an American actor and male model, in 1984. Two years later, during the filming of The Crow, Hollywood actor Brandon Lee was killed by a firearm accident. This drew international attention and spurred modifications in the way Guns are handled on set. Given the potential for damage, one would believe that these improvements would be 100 percent effective, but that assumption was incorrect.

We might debate whether or not live rounds should be allowed on movie sets in the first place, or we could blame the prop coordinator. However, previous situations have elicited the same reactions! As a result, at this time in storytelling and filmmaking, we must address an important issue that requires an immediate response: “Considering the violence it causes in fiction and reality, should Guns still be a thing in movies?”

The Outlaw, an American Western film directed by Howard Hughes in 1943, was a pioneer in the use of guns in film. Since then, an Associated Press report from 2016 found that at least 43 individuals died on set in the United States between 1990 and the time of publication, with more than 150 others suffering life-altering injuries. What appeared to be a harmless tool for entertainment and realism has resulted in disastrous consequences that have spread beyond the confines of movies and into society.

A liberal viewpoint can advocate for the freedom to use weapons for enjoyment, hunting, defense, or any other reason. This notion, on the other hand, puts the lives and property of innocent people in jeopardy. Without a doubt, Guns improves the entertainment value of films, particularly those in the action genre. But how long will we be able to consume these performances without One questioning their morality before the pistol is pulled? Two, ‘considering the implications of the pulled trigger.’

We are way past the point of shouting for greater safety measures on movie sets, after so many life-threatening accidents and deaths! We can’t afford to lose time considering this, so another accident or death doesn’t happen to any crew member who is simply enjoying a good day’s work.

Finally, Hollywood has a role to play in preventing gun violence, Onset, and offset!

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