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I should be home before 7pm; I am usually an early-home-kind of person. Anna had insisted I stayed a little while and meet the tall boy with the polished accent. Every other girl in the room pretended like they were waiting for omacabs; the application was a bit faulty at that time so it was a good excuse for them to hang around.  We all came here with omas so it was simply wise to go home with omas.

They hung around the tiny room sighing and waving their phones in the air at an attempt to get network that their phone already had. One particular girl with a barbed voice and an oblong face strode to the middle of the room in a six inches black sandal. I thought she was going to trip because her weight felt too big for the tiny heeled sandals she stood on. She wasn’t a fine girl and nobody in the room took notice of her except her cliques who giggled and made irritating sounds.

‘Which one of you has hope in going home with him?’ she asked to no one in particular, so nobody answered. She must have felt her swag bruised because she started pointing at some other girls in the room. A girl with a very pale and scarred skin raised her voice at the fat girl and told her to shut up. Soon a verbal war broke out between the two with nobody taking any particular interest in their banter.

Soon the room went back to its quiet anticipating state. Anna soon got bored as well because she started looking at her phone. ‘We should go already. I am not interested in this thin boy’, I told her.

‘You only say that because you’ve not seen him. Wait till you do’. I sighed and relaxed back into my stool. Half an hour later, we were all still waiting for the boy with the polished accent. I stood up and went into the restroom. I was furious, how can one single boy keep 25 girls waiting for close to 5 hours. I thought they were all mad to even wait. Don’t they have parents or people waiting on them? How can they stay out so late? The night is just so beautiful, yet bad.

I’ve seen his picture somewhere and he isn’t as fine as they say, he was just lucky to have a polished accent. 


When I came into the room, they were all gone. Anna’s bloody phone sat on my stool. It had been recording. The video was blurry and unclear but I could make out his accent. He had come and taken them away. I felt gloomy that I wasn’t part of the girls but where were they taken to? 


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ENUGU- The Igbo leaders, including the Ohanaeze Ndigbo, Igbo Leaders of Thought, the political elite, the intelligentsia, women groups, religious leaders, among others, have resolved to support the Presidential candidate of the Peoples Democratic Party, PDP, Alhaji Atiku Abubakar and his running mate, Mr. Peter Obi in the 2019 presidential election.


They said that they would identify with Atiku and his deputy because of their promise to restructure the country along geopolitical zones.


This was contained in a communique read on behalf of Ndigbo by Chief Olisa Agbakoba (SAN). The communique titled “Ndigbo 2019 and beyond Summit read: “The Igbo people of Nigeria held a one day non-partisan and inclusive summit, convened by elders, traditional and religious leaders on November 14 2018, to consider Ndigbo’s place in the polity, especially in the light of the forthcoming 2019 elections.

“The summit deliberated on the state on Ndigbo in Nigeria today, especially after years of exclusion from the center. This country has never been so divided as it is today. We, Igbo, have always yearned for a level playing field with justice, equity and fairness.

“The summit recognized the nomination of His Excellency Mr. Peter Obi, former Governor of Anambra state as the vice presidential candidate of the PDP and fully endorse this nomination. It was acknowledged that this nomination puts Ndigbo back to the centre of governance. It is therefore important that Ndigbo should rally behind the Atiku/Obi ticket. 

“We identify with Atiku/ Obi ticket on the restructuring agenda as has been reiterated by the four zones of the country, namely South-South, South west, North central and South east. We believe that as long as the federating units remain weak, the centre will continue to be weak. We equally move to appreciate the position of the Atiku/Obi ticket in promoting national unity.


“In conclusion, the summit reiterated that the time is now for Ndigbo to mobilize and organise effectively, realize the Atiku/Obi ticket. We are not campaigning against anybody, we are simply campaigning for our very survival. Igbo votes must count wherever they leave in Nigeria.”

Speaking earlier,the President General of Ohanaeze Ndigbo, Chief Nnia Nwodo has said that although would meet in January to decided the way forward for Ndigbo, Atiku performed better than other presidential candidates interviewed by his committee to find a president for the country. He said that there were four million Igbo residing in Lagos; 11.6 million in the north and 500,000 in China, among others, pointing out that Igbo votes can make the difference if counted.

Nwodo suggested that among the issues that should be presented to Atiku should restructuring, completion of second Niger bridge, building of railways across eastern states and as well as maltreatment of Ndigbo in Nigeria. Also speaking, wife of former president of Nigeria, Prof Uche Azikiwe said that there should be written agreement between Ndigbo and Atiku over his polices to serve a reference point. Senator Ike Nwachukwu, Chief SN Okeke, Dr. Okesilieze Nwodo also spoke their different states.


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      NEW YORK – Nov. 13, 2018 – Forbes today released the eighth annual “30 Under 30” list, featuring 600 young innovators, entrepreneurs and risk-takers who are putting a new twist on what it means to be a leader for the next generation.  The Forbes class of 2019 30 Under 30 list, includes 30 honorees for each of the 20 categories.

 

“After nearly a decade, the Forbes 30 Under 30 list has become the most trusted index identifying the next generation of entrepreneurs, visionaries, and game-changers throughout the world,” said Randall Lane, Chief Content Officer, Forbes and creator of the Forbes Under 30 franchise. “Our honorees have already begun implementing fundamental change in their respective industries, and they’ve only just begun."

 

The 2019 list features a diverse and unique panel of honorees, with more than nineteen percent identifying as immigrants and more than thirty-eight percent identifying as first-generation citizens. Thirty-four percent of these list members live and work on the East Coast and thirty-three percent on the West Coast. More than fifth-five percent of the list are founders or co-founders and the group has collectively raised well over $1 billion in funding.

 

 

Each of the 20 categories has a featured call-out. The call-outs on the 2019 “30 Under 30” list include:

 

Art & Style: Sarah Staudinger, Fashion Designer, STAUD; Consumer Technology: Daria Rebenok, Co-founder, Grabr; Education: Rebecca Kantar, Founder, Imbellus; Energy: Raj Mistry, Co-founder, Lynx Resource Partners; Enterprise Technology: Gregory Rockson, Co-founder & CEO, mPharma; Finance: Nader Al-Naji, CEO, Intangible Labs; Food & Drink: Maya French, Co-founder, Koia; Games: Delane Parnell, Founder, PlayVS; Healthcare: Trevor Martin, Co-founder, Mammoth Bio-sciences; Hollywood & Entertainment: Liza Koshy, comedian and actress; Law & Policy: Nicholas Cortes, Co-founder, Atrium; Manufacturing & Industry: Alex Rodrigues, Co-founder, Embark; Marketing & Advertising: Nadia Masri, Founder, Perksy; Media: Brandon Deyo, Co-founder, Mars Reel; Music: Russ, singer & songwriter; Retail & E commerce: Kory Stevens, Co-founder, Taft; Science: Devaki Raj, Co-founder, CrowdAI; Social Entrepreneurs: Ryan Pandya, Co-founder, Perfect Day; Sports: Blake Griffin, Power Forward for the Detroit Clippers, National Basketball Association; and Venture Capital: Adina Tecklu, Co-Head, Canaan Beta.

 

All under 30 years old, the honorees were vetted during an extensive three-layer process that leveraged the knowledge and authority of Forbes’ wide-reaching community, skilled reporters and expert judges.  Over the past eight years, Forbes has grown a 30 Under 30 alumni network of more than 5,000 individuals throughout the world. The names within this network exemplify Forbes’ longstanding reputation of spotlighting up-and-coming revolutionaries and trailblazers who are positioned to implement real change across a variety of industries.

 

More than 15,000 online submissions were received for only 600 slots, making it a 4 percent acceptance rate. Forbes collaborated with expert judges in each category, including Musa Tariq in Marketing, Jeanie Buss and Martellus Bennett in Sports, Tory Burch in Art & Style, Anil Agarwal in Retail & E-commerce, Andy Fang in Consumer Tech, Liz Claman and Jon Steinbergin Media, Allison Schroeder and Fowler Jermaine in Hollywood & Entertainment, Marshmello in Music, Nic Jammet and Lee Schrager in Food & Drink, Jean Case in Social Entrepreneurs, Austin McChord in Enterprise Technology, David Axelrod in Law & Policy and Brian Sheth in Finance to create a distinctive list of 600 youthful visionaries and disruptors, all of whom represent the entrepreneurial spirit of the Forbes Under 30 franchise.

 

For the complete list, feature stories and exclusive videos, visit:      www.forbes.com/30-under-30/2019/                                                          

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Many of the world’s billionaires had fortunes already laid down for them to build on. Although this makes life a lot easier for the few opportuned individuals, many others who attained this billionaire status built everything from nothing.

In Africa, there are a few billionaires who built multi-billion dollar empires from absolutely nothing and non-wealthy beginnings. These wealthy African entrepreneurs, through their success stories, have given hope to thousands of smart and determined young Africans willing to put in the effort to someday reach the self-made billionaire dollar status.

While not everyone can someday be labeled a billionaire, some eventually will, and many others will become millionaires and multi-millionaires.

The short stories of these 5 successful African entrepreneurs will drive a sense of purpose to many who read this, and perhaps, set you up better motivated to strive for even greater achievements.


1). Mike Adenuga:


This Nigerian billionaire is stipulated by the Forbes billionaire list 2017, to be worth about $6.1 billion U.S dollars. He’s the second wealthiest Nigerian, after Aliko Dangote, and also owns the second largest telecoms operator in Nigeria, with locations in Ghana, and the Benin Republic.

Born on the 29th of April 1953 to Michael Agbolade Adenuga, a school teacher, he received his secondary education in Ibadan, Nigeria. Upon proceeding to the University, he worked as a taxi driver to help fund his education, and eventually graduated from the Northwestern Oklahoma University and the Pace University, New York, with degrees in Business Administration.

When Adenuga returned from America to Nigeria, he took over his mother’s small business and sold laces, coca-cola products, and other commodities. As he grew the business to sustainable heights, his revenues rose, till the venture became a larger enterprise.

In 1990, he got an oil drilling license from the Nigerian government and realized he had struck gold, when in 1991, his company discovered oil in the shallow waters of south western Ondo state, in Nigeria.

Today, the rest is history, as he has investments in Telecommunications, Banking, Oil & Gas, and several other sectors of the Nigerian economy.

 

2). Folorunsho Alakija:


Mrs. Alakija is the wealthiest Nigerian woman, and also the second wealthiest African woman with a personal net worth of about $1.61 billion U.S dollars, according to the Forbes billionaire list 2017. She has investments in fashion, oil, and the printing industries.

Alakija was born in 1951 to Chief L.A Ogbara in Lagos State, Nigeria. At the age of seven, she relocated to the United Kingdom to engage in a four-year primary school education program. After returning to Nigeria, she traveled yet again to London to study fashion.

When she was finally done with her fashion education, she returned to Nigeria and started working as an executive secretary at Sijuade Enterprises. She later moved on to another company and worked for some years before establishing a tailoring company called Supreme Stitches. Her tailoring business got popular over the years, and subsequently, its in-house brand, Rose of Sharon House of Fashion, became a household name among the Nigerian elites.

In 1993, she applied for an oil prospecting license from the Nigerian government. The license was granted to her company, Famfa Oil, which is situated on a 617,000 acre block, now referred to as OPL 216.

Alakija’s success-story shows one who always takes advantages of opportunities at the right time. From the success of her fashion line, she was able to venture into the oil business, and is today one of the most powerful women in the world. 


3). Patrice Motsepe:


Patrice Motsepe is a South African mining magnate. Born on the 28th of January, 1962, to a school teacher turn businessman, Augustine Motsepe, Patrice grew up learning a lot of his basic entrepreneurial knowledge from his father.

After earning a bachelor of arts from the University of Swaziland and a law degree from the University of Witswatersrand, he became the first black person to rise to the position of partner in the law firm Bowman Gilfillan, in 1994.

At that time, his area of focus was in mining and business law, where he saw an opportunity, and so founded a mining services business to clean gold dust from inside mine shafts.

In 1997, with the price of gold low at the time, he purchased marginal gold mines at a favourable cost, and subsequently started a string of purchases by buying operating mines, which eventually led to his optimal wealth.

As of 2017, according to the Forbes billionaire list, Patrice’s net worth is estimated to be placed at about $1.81 billion U.S dollars.


4). Mohamed Al-Fayed:


Mohamed is a business mogul born and raised in Egypt. Also born to a school teacher, he made his first trial at entrepreneurship by selling home-made lemonade at school. Many years later, he founded a shipping company with his brothers in Egypt, and later moved its operating base to Genoa, Italy, with other offices in London.

In the mid 1960’s, Al-Fayed got in acquaintance with the ruler of Dubai, Sheikh Rashid Al Makhtoum, who later entrusted him with a part responsibility in helping to transform Dubai. Given this task, Al-Fayed brought in construction companies like the Costain Group, Taylor Woodrow, and Sunley & Sons to execute the construction project.

He later went on to become a financial advisor to the Sultan of Brunei, Omar Ali Saifuddien III, in 1966.

Mohamed Al-Fayed, according to the Forbes billionaire list 2017, is estimated to be worth about $1.82 billion U.S Dollars, and resides in Geneva, Switzerland.

5). Koos Bekker:


Koos Bekker is the founder and chairman of the African media group, Naspers. The company is located in about 130 countries, and is listed both on the London & South African stock exchange.

Koos was born in South Africa on December 14th, 1952. He got his bachelors degrees from Stellenbosch University in Law and Literature, and Wits University in Law. He later got an MBA from the Columbia Business School, and as a result of a project paper, he and some of his friends founded the first pay-tv service (M-Net, Multi-Choice, and more) outside of the United States. He’s also one of the founding directors of the largest telecommunication company in Africa, MTN.

According to the Forbes billionaire list 2017, Koos Bekker is estimated to be worth about $2.1 billion U.S dollars.


(startuptipsdaily)
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Bafana Bafana coach Stuart Baxter says he and his team holds no fear over facing Nigeria’s Super Eagles in Saturday’s 2019 Africa Cup of Nations qualifier at the FNB Stadium Johannesburg, reports Completesportsnigeria.com.

Baxter who is gunning for his third win in three games when Bafana face the Super Eagles expects the three-time African champions to have vengeance on their mind ahead of the clash.


The British gaffer led South Africa to a 2-1 win over Nigeria in 2004 in a Mandela Challenge before defeating the Super Eagles 2-0 in a 2019 AFCON qualifier in Uyo in June 2017 – his first match in his second stint at the helms.

“Everybody knows what I said in the first press conference (a week ago) that despite that (the injuries) I want to speak about the players that we do have because even though we respect Nigeria, we do not fear them.

“I think we have still enough talent‚ enough desire and if we can structure a game plan in the next three or four days‚ I think by the time we run out onto the FNB Stadium, we would be confident‚ we would not be complacent‚ because Nigeria have just come from a (2018) World Cup (in Russia).


“They are undefeated since we beat them the last time (in the first qualifier in June last year) and they will certainly want to wreak their revenge.


“So‚ we will be ready and I still believe that we have a very good chance of getting the result that we need.”


After the match-day-five AFCON qualifiers on Saturday in Johannesburg, the Bafana Bafana will travel to Durban’s Moses Mabhida Stadium to welcome Paraguay in the Nelson Mandela Challenge next Tuesday.


A former international, Garba Lawal has said the 2019 AFCON qualifier against the Bafana Bafana of South Africa is a must win match for the Super Eagles.

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I should be home before 7pm; I am usually an early-home-kind of person. Anna had insisted I stayed a little while and meet the tall boy with the polished accent. Every other girl in the room pretended like they were waiting for omacabs; the application was a bit faulty at that time so it was a good excuse for them to hang around.  We all came here with omas so it was simply wise to go home with omas.

They hung around the tiny room sighing and waving their phones in the air at an attempt to get network that their phone already had. One particular girl with a barbed voice and an oblong face strode to the middle of the room in a six inches black sandal. I thought she was going to trip because her weight felt too big for the tiny heeled sandals she stood on. She wasn’t a fine girl and nobody in the room took notice of her except her cliques who giggled and made irritating sounds.

‘Which one of you has hope in going home with him?’ she asked to no one in particular, so nobody answered. She must have felt her swag bruised because she started pointing at some other girls in the room. A girl with a very pale and scarred skin raised her voice at the fat girl and told her to shut up. Soon a verbal war broke out between the two with nobody taking any particular interest in their banter.

Soon the room went back to its quiet anticipating state. Anna soon got bored as well because she started looking at her phone. ‘We should go already. I am not interested in this thin boy’, I told her.

‘You only say that because you’ve not seen him. Wait till you do’. I sighed and relaxed back into my stool. Half an hour later, we were all still waiting for the boy with the polished accent. I stood up and went into the restroom. I was furious, how can one single boy keep 25 girls waiting for close to 5 hours. I thought they were all mad to even wait. Don’t they have parents or people waiting on them? How can they stay out so late? The night is just so beautiful, yet bad.

I’ve seen his picture somewhere and he isn’t as fine as they say, he was just lucky to have a polished accent. 


When I came into the room, they were all gone. Anna’s bloody phone sat on my stool. It had been recording. The video was blurry and unclear but I could make out his accent. He had come and taken them away. I felt gloomy that I wasn’t part of the girls but where were they taken to? 


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Someone shrieked my name from the background, I didn't have to look to know who it was; my mother. Her presence doubled my determination; I closed my eyes once again not minding her sorrow laden pleas. I slowly disengaged my hands on the wall, this was it but as I was about to drown my sorrows by taking this one jump, an arm grabbed me, it was strong, couldn't be my mother. I looked up at the owner, his face blurry due to the heavy tears in my eyes. He said the word 'please' I starred on at him, he was a stranger not anyone I knew. He couldn't see that I have to do this, he couldn't see that this was somehow going to be a relief to me; that dying at that moment was going to be a lifted burden. "U can't see me" I slowly muttered and slipped from his arms. He screamed Nooo or maybe it was my mother behind him, as I hung in the air with only his hands holding me from embracing this evil destiny.

I looked down it was really a very long way to go, making me a bit scared. "I see you" he suddenly said, he repeated it again making me look up. New tears broke through. "Hold my hands" he said "and don’t let go, please" I just held his hands suddenly scared with blood rushing through my face and head. He pulled me up and we fell on the cold hard floor of my balcony. With me lying on top of him, I didn't let go. I embraced him with all I've got as he repeated yet again "I see u Etomi"

That day had changed me somehow. The press had wanted to know what happened, interviews had been granted; ‘don’t make alcohol your soul mate while partying in your balcony' I had said, smiling at the camera. I closed my media account not wanting to bear any insults, the inevitable news and its papers were enough to make me want to go on a second journey. Mother had given me a sound slap the moment we were alone. She made me promise and I had promised. 

My prince charming had been my new assigned officer; I never knew I had one. Well there were many things I didn't know. I knocked once on his door and waited for an answer, none, I knocked again then again. He slowly opened. We stood at the door to his room that was close to mine. “Thank you" I said. “Never really had the opportunity ". He looked at me then scoffed. “I was doing my job ma'am ". His words were swift cuts. I stared at him, surprised he could say that. “you saw me, what did you see?" I asked, suddenly desperate. He looked at me like I disgust him and said "nothing” I starred at him a while longer and left. I cancelled all following interviews giving an order that I wanted to be alone. Mother stayed a little longer and I wondered if she would ever leave and when she did I knew she wouldn't let me be all by myself even though I promised. It wasn't long before I heard a knock. I just needed to be alone and stayed put not wanting to answer. The knock came again, louder this time. I knew if I didn't answer, it was going to cause an uproar, maybe I had finally gone through with it. I sighed and got up to answer. Opening the door, was my prince charming officer. I let him in and walked to my bed, he was here to do his job, babysit me. He followed me in and I wondered if it was proper, he was suppose to be at the door if am correct. "Am sorry. I didn't mean what I said earlier" he said. I looked up at him, "am truly sorry", he repeated.”What did you see?" I asked him again.

 A broken soul, he sees a broken soul. I Don’t think I have ever been described better starting from when mother had enrolled me in that competition at the age of 7 and I had did my best coming out in the second place. Mother had smashed my little trophy and said my best was not enough. I could remember her question once we were out of there; she had asked “do you want to be in the second place all your life? Once you start, you've started. You don’t smile when you wound up second Etomi. It’s a disgrace and I know you could do better “And throughout the years she had enrolled me in few more competitions and auditions. I never got anything reasonable until the age of 19 when I was picked by __talent finders._ Mother had signed the contracts. I never knew what it was all about but she said things were going to be better. My life has changed that minute, I was told what to speak, how to sing, how to stand and pose, what to wear and who to meet and stay with. My life wasn't my own. I wasn't living anymore. I simply existed...a robot. I would have to sleep with my label managers if I wanted to not just rise but also to shine. Mother had said that good things don't come easily and that she was right behind me. I was later linked to the most ill-looking celebrity artiste and that was when all the sleeping and word abuse stopped. We collaborated in a song I most certainly found highly vulgar and the music dance, unacceptable but Mother had said it was okay since we won the award and in the process making me more successful. I drank and partied, smoked and partied, slept with some of my collaborators for hit music. That was the circle of my life for years. And hate shades were not easy too. I was in the top 10 of celebrities who were bad influence. Nothing I did mattered. They said I was going to end up in a rehab and probably die in the tub in my bathroom. I was tired of merely existing and since living has proven 'not' possible, maybe not living was the best. I just couldn't continue, couldn't go on. I had sat on the walls of my balcony, my life flashing before my eyes, ready to let go.

Ola is an endowed fictional and non-fictional writer with a fiery twist to her writings, which always keeps readers coming back for more. She is an impulsive reader with a flair for things unusual.

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Fela Anikulapo Kuti was born on the 15 October 1938 and passed away on 3 August 1997 due to Kaposi's sarcoma. He was a Nigerian multi-instrumentalist, strict political nonconformist, human rights activist, musician, composer and pioneer of the Afrobeat music genre. There is no doubt that Afrobeat pioneer has paved the way for many musicians in Nigeria and throughout Africa.


Here are 10 things you probably didn’t know about the legend


1. Fela Anikulapo Kuti was born by the name Olufela Olusegun Oludotun Ransome-Kuti on 15 October 1938 and pasted away on 3 August 1997 due to kaposi’s sarcoma. He stated that “Ransome” was his slave name and his middle name, Anikulapo means “He who carries death in his pouch”.


2. His father, Reverend Israel Oludotun Ransome-Kuti was the first president of the Nigeria Union of Teachers and was an Anglican minister. His mother, Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti was a feminist activist.


3. He studied music at the Trinity College of Music in London. He is the cousin to Wole Soyinka, a Nigerian writer and a member of the Nobel laureate.


4. He married his first wife, Remilekun Taylor in 1960 and they were blessed with 3 beautiful children. Later on, to mark the anniversary of the attack on the Kalakuta Republic, Fela married 27 women in 1978.


5. He formed the band “Koola Lobitos” which played highlife and jazz music. He also trained as a radio producer for the Nigerian Broadcasting Corporation.